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Richest football leagues in the world

Anyone who has ever bought a season ticket is totally aware that why some clubs are able to pay their players 6 figures or more every single week, and it's why the owners of many clubs are the richest people on the planet.
Richest football leagues in the world

Football leagues are entertaining, thrilling, nutritious, chaotic, and they make us feel alive. There are many reasons why people enjoy football but the most lucrative football leagues are mainly a profitable industry for their executives.

They are entertaining, thrilling, nutritious, chaotic, and they make us feel alive. There are many reasons why people enjoy sports. But the most lucrative sports leagues are mainly a profitable industry for sports executives. Today, athletics, receiving billions of dollars from different outlets, have become one of the most profitable aspects of the entertainment business.

European football is popular all over the world, with millions cheering in stadiums and on screens in millions of homes. For English and European football clubs, a new report shows record sales generated for 2018/19 ahead of the COVID-19 financial effect.

For the year spanning the 2018/19 season, the European football market as a whole created a record EUR 28.9 billion (£25.5bn). The European football market as a whole generated a record of €28.9 billion (£25.5bn) for the year covering the 2018/19 season. Growth was again driven by the ‘big five’ European leagues, which benefitted from receiving the majority of an additional €700m of distributions from UEFA to clubs in their competitions.

The European football market alone is estimated to be worth around €25.5 billion a year in annual revenue, with emerging markets in Asia and the US catching up.

The European football market generated €28.9bn in revenues in the 2018/19 season, according to Deloitte’s Annual Review of Football Finance;

The ‘big five’ European leagues generated a record €17 in revenue in 2018/19, a 9% increase from the previous year;

The ‘big five’ leagues generated aggregated operating profits of €1.4 billion for the 2018/19 season, an increase of 7% on the prior year.

Premier League clubs’ revenues rose to more than €5.9 billion, an increase of 7%, driven by growth in UEFA distributions to English clubs;

Clubs in Spain’s La Liga generated combined revenues of €3.4bn in 2018/19, the second highest absolute growth amongst the ‘big five’ leagues, surpassing the Bundesliga (€3.3 billion) in terms of revenue;

In Serie A (€2.5 billion) and Ligue 1 (€1.9 billion), strong revenue growth was noted, with 11% and 12% uplifts respectively.

As you can see, the richest football leagues in the world right now are all European ones. However, don't expect this to remain the case for much longer, as other leagues continue to catch up.

Let's take a closer look at the most valuable football leagues in the world:

It should be mentioned that the wealth is not evenly distributed and much of it is generated and held by a few elite, well-known leagues.

English Premier League

Richest football leagues in the world

The Premier League, often referred to outside England as the English Premier League or the EPL, is the top level of the English football league system and one of the world's most valuable soccer leagues. Contested by 20 clubs, it operates on a system of promotion and relegation with the English Football League (EFL).

Seasons run from August to May with each team playing 38 matches, playing all 19 other teams both home and away.

The Premier League stands above all leagues as the richest football league in the world. The combined revenues of the league last season amounted to around £5.7 billion, which also makes the EPL the third-wealthiest league in the world after the NFL and Major League Baseball.

The Premier League has 12 billionaire owners, possessing a combined wealth of around £72 billion. In addition, the Premier League is one of the most popular leagues for soccer betting around the world, with fans of Arsenal, Manchester United, Chelsea, and the rest betting billions of pounds on the fixtures every single year.

Elite-level football is an attractive investment prospect for billionaires across the world thanks to the associated prestige and potential for lucrative returns of the world's richest football leagues.

Premier League clubs’ combined revenues passed £5 billion for the first time in the 2018/19 season, a year-on-year increase of 7%, according to the 29th Annual Review of Football Finance from the Sports Business Group at Deloitte. In revenue terms, the Premier League was 73% larger than its nearest competitor, Spain’s La Liga.

Revenue polarization between and within European football leagues continued to grow. This trend is likely to be exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic, as the biggest clubs are likely to have the most contractually protected revenues, whilst smaller clubs rely more heavily on match day revenue and single-season commercial agreements.

Clubs in Spain’s La Liga generated combined revenues of €3.4bn in 2018/19, surpassing the Bundesliga (€3.3bn). However, the earlier return to play of matches in the Bundesliga during the disrupted 2019/20 season will likely see the German league report higher revenues than La Liga in 2019/20. La Liga is expected to return to being Europe’s second highest revenue generating league from 2020/21, due to increased broadcasting revenues.

Italy’s Serie A (€2.5bn) and France’s Ligue 1 (€1.9bn) complete the €17bn revenue that was achieved by the ‘big five’ European leagues in 2018/19, a new record.

The Premier League is the richest league in the world and a number of its clubs are owned by billionaire businessmen from Russia, China, the United States, and the Middle East.

Sheikh Mansour-Man City ($20bn)

Richest football leagues in the world

Manchester City owner Sheikh Mansour ushered in a golden era when he took over the club in 2008, pumping millions into the project in pursuit of Premier League glory.

The Emirati's wealth has been amassed through the oil industry, but he has spread his wealth around a number of different investments.

Roman Abramovich-Chelsea ($11.3bn)

Before Sheikh Mansour at Man City, Russian businessman Roman Abramovich built an empire at Chelsea using his vast wealth, which was accrued chiefly through oil and steel manufacturing.

Abramovich's investment in the Blues began in 2003 and helped to bring Premier League and Champions League trophies to the London club.

Stan Kroenke-Arsenal ($10bn)

American billionaire Stan Kroenke owns and operates Arsenal through his Kroenke Sports and Entertainment Company.

Gunners’ fans are not particularly enamored with Kroenke, though, who is accused by some of 'absentee ownership'.

The American also owns MLS side Colorado Rapids, the Los Angeles Rams in NFL, the Denver Nuggets in the NBA and the Colorado Avalanche in NHL.

Aiyawatt Srivaddhanaprabha & family-Leicester City ($6bn)

CEO of King Power Aiyawatt Srivaddhanaprabha is the owner of Premier League club Leicester City, having taken over from his father Vichai, who tragically died in a helicopter crash in 2018.

King Power is a Thai business which deals in the Duty Free sector.

Joe Lewis & Daniel Levy-Tottenham ($6bn)

North London club Tottenham are owned by British businessmen Joe Lewis and Daniel Levy.

Lewis is the head of ENIC International and the Tavistock Group, which has a diverse investment portfolio, ranging from oil, gas and energy to agriculture and logistics. Levy, meanwhile, is part-owner of ENIC International and has been involved with various football investments.

Nassef Sawiris-Aston Villa ($5.8bn)

Richest football leagues in the world

Egyptian businessman Nassef Sawiris made his fortune in the construction industry and is one of the richest Africans in the world, according to Forbes.

Sawiris became involved in the running of Aston Villa in 2018, taking over from Tony Xia.

Guo Guanchang-Wolves ($5.6bn)

Wolves are owned by Chinese conglomerate Fosun International, the head of which, Guo Guanchang, boasts a net worth of nearly $6 billion (£5bn). Fosun International works in a number of different sectors, including pharmaceutical and research areas.

Wolves have had significant investment under Fosun International which has helped them to earn promotion to the Premier League and challenge for qualification to the Champions League.

Glazer family-Manchester United ($5bn)

The Glazer family took control of Manchester United in 2005, prompting an acrimonious split within the Red Devils fanbase, the tremors of which are still felt today.

Their business portfolio is extensive, including healthcare ventures, property, and banking interests, among other things.

Joshua Harris-Crystal Palace ($4.3bn)

A private equity investor who has worked with the Trump administration, Joshua Harris is part-owner of Crystal Palace, along with Steve Parish and David S. Blitzer.

As well as Palace, Harris also has controlling interests in NHL team the New Jersey Devils and NBA team the Philadelphia 76ers.

 Mike Ashley-Newcastle United ($2.8bn)

One of the most controversial owners of a Premier League club in recent years, Mike Ashley is the man whose hands are on the fortunes of Newcastle United.

Ashley is a retail magnate, running the sportswear chain Sports Direct, but his relationship with Magpies supporters means that he may not be the owner for much longer, with a Saudi takeover on the cards.

John W. Henry & Thomas C. Werner (FSG)-Liverpool ($2.7bn)

American billionaire John W. Henry is the principal owner of Liverpool alongside TV producer and businessman Tom Werner. The pair, who runs Fenway Sports Group (FSG), also owns the Boston Red Sox.

Henry and Werner took over Liverpool in 2010 and have gradually brought the club back to the summit of English and European football, securing a Champions League title in 2019.

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Farhad Moshiri-Everton ($2.4bn)

Richest football leagues in the world

British-Iranian businessman Farhad Moshiri is the chief owner of Everton, having acquired a controlling stake in the club in 2016.

He made his money in the steel and energy industry and previously owned a stake in Arsenal.

Liverpool ended their 30-year wait for a title by romping to the 2019-20 Premier League crown, and their success saw them earn more money in combined prize money and TV revenue than any other side in the competition for the second consecutive year.

Thanks to Swiss Ramble’s excellent work, we’ve estimated how much every club in the Premier League will take home in prize money and TV revenue following the conclusion of the 2019-20 campaign.

The system has changed this season. Each club is given an equal share of £31.8m from the domestic TV deal, with an extra facility fee depending on how many times they are broadcast.

They also receive a £5m share of commercial revenue each and equal share of £43.2m each from overseas TV rights.

However, they then receive an extra share of overseas TV rights income, with the value increasing depending on how high up the table they finish.

Each club’s earnings from TV and prize money for the 2019-20 campaign is broken down, ranking them in order of how much they accrued over the season.

Liverpool

Richest football leagues in the world
  • Actual league position: 1st
  • Equal share: £31.8m
  • Facility fees: £31m
  • Merit payment: £35.5m
  • Overseas TV income: £71.3m
  • Commercial revenue: £5m
  • Total: £174.6m
  • 2018-19 payment: £152.4m
  • Difference: +£22.2m

Manchester City

  • Actual league position: 2nd
  • Equal share: £31.8m
  • Facility fees: £27.9m
  • Merit payment: £33.8m
  • Overseas TV income: £69.9m
  • Commercial revenue: £5m
  • Total: £168.3m
  • 2018-19 payment: £151m
  • Difference: +£17.3m

Manchester United

  • Actual league position: 3rd
  • Equal share: £31.8m
  • Facility fees: £28.9m
  • Merit payment: £32m
  • Overseas TV income: £68.5m
  • Commercial revenue: £5m
  • Total: £166.2m
  • 2018-19 payment: £142.5m
  • Difference: +£23.7m

Chelsea

  • Actual league position: 4th
  • Equal share: £31.8m
  • Facility fees: £26.8m
  • Merit payment: £30.2m
  • Overseas TV income: £67.1m
  • Commercial revenue: £5m
  • Total: £160.9m
  • 2018-19 payment: £146m
  • Difference: +£14.9m

Tottenham

  • Actual league position: 6th
  • Equal share: £31.8m
  • Facility fees: £27.9m
  • Merit payment: £26.6m
  • Overseas TV income: £64.3m
  • Commercial revenue: £5m
  • Total: £155.6m
  • 2018-19 payment: £145.2m
  • Difference: +£10.4m

Arsenal

Richest football leagues in the world
  • Actual league position: 8th
  • Equal share: £31.8m
  • Facility fees: £26.8m
  • Merit payment: £23.1m
  • Overseas TV income: £61.5m
  • Commercial revenue: £5m
  • Total: £148.2m
  • 2018-19 payment: £142.2m
  • Difference: +£6m

Leicester City

  • Actual league position: 5th
  • Equal share: £31.8m
  • Facility fees: £16.5m
  • Merit payment: £28.4m
  • Overseas TV income: £65.7m
  • Commercial revenue: £5m
  • Total: £147.4m
  • 2018-19 payment: £123.3m
  • Difference: £24.1m

Wolves

  • Actual league position: 7th

  • Equal share: £31.8m
  • Facility fees: £16.5m
  • Merit payment: £24.9m
  • Overseas TV income: £62.9m
  • Commercial revenue: £5m
  • Total: £141.1m
  • 2018-19 payment: £127.2m
  • Difference: +£13.9m

 Sheffield United

  • Actual league position: 9th
  • Equal share: £31.8m
  • Facility fees: £14.4m
  • Merit payment: £21.3m
  • Overseas TV income: £60.1m
  • Commercial revenue: £5m
  • Total: £132.6m
  • 2018-19 payment: £7.1m
  • Difference: +£125.5m

Everton

  • Actual league position: 12th
  • Equal share: £31.8m
  • Facility fees: £19.6m
  • Merit payment: £16.0m
  • Overseas TV income: £55.8m
  • Commercial revenue: £5m
  • Total: £128.2m
  • 2018-19 payment: £128.6m
  • Difference: -£0.4m

Burnley

  • Actual league position: 10th
  • Equal share: £31.8m
  • Facility fees: £12.3m
  • Merit payment: £19.5m
  • Overseas TV income: £58.7m
  • Commercial revenue: £5m
  • Total: £127.3m
  • 2018-19 payment: £107.3m
  • Difference: +£20m

Newcastle United

  • Actual league position: 13th
  • Equal share: £31.8m
  • Facility fees: £20.6m
  • Merit payment: £14.2m
  • Overseas TV income: £54.4m
  • Commercial revenue: £5m
  • Total: £126m
  • 2018-19 payment: £120.1m
  • Difference: +£5.9m

Southampton

  • Actual league position: 11th
  • Equal share: £31.8m
  • Facility fees: £11.3m
  • Merit payment: £17.8m
  • Overseas TV income: £57.2m
  • Commercial revenue: £5m
  • Total: £123.1m
  • 2018-19 payment: £104.3m
  • Difference: +£18.8m

Crystal Palace

  • Actual league position: 14th
  • Equal share: £31.8m
  • Facility fees: £13.4m
  • Merit payment: £12.4
  • Overseas TV income: £53m
  • Commercial revenue: £5m
  • Total: £115.6m
  • 2018-19 payment: £114.2m
  • Difference: +£1.4m

Brighton

  • Actual league position: 15th
  • Equal share: £31.8m
  • Facility fees: £14.4m
  • Merit payment: £10.7m
  • Overseas TV income: £51.6m
  • Commercial revenue: £5m
  • Total: £113.5m
  • 2018-19 payment: £105.7m
  • Difference: +£7.8m

West Ham

  • Actual league position: 16th
  • Equal share: £31.8m
  • Facility fees: £17.5m
  • Merit payment: £8.9m
  • Overseas TV income: £50.2m
  • Commercial revenue: £5m
  • Total: £113.4m
  • 2018-19 payment: £122.5m
  • Difference: -£9.1m

Aston Villa

  • Actual league position: 17th
  • Equal share: £31.8m
  • Facility fees: £13.4m
  • Merit payment: £7.1m
  • Overseas TV income: £48.8m
  • Commercial revenue: £5m
  • Total: £106.1m
  • 2018-19 payment: £18m
  • Difference: +£88.1m

Bournemouth

  • Actual league position: 18th
  • Equal share: £31.8m
  • Facility fees: £11.3m
  • Merit payment: £5.3m
  • Overseas TV income: £47.4m
  • Commercial revenue: £5m
  • Total: £100.8m
  • 2018-19 payment: £108.1m
  • Difference: -£7.3m

Watford

  • Actual league position: 19th
  • Equal share: £31.8m
  • Facility fees: £11.3m
  • Merit payment: £3.6m
  • Overseas TV income: £46m
  • Commercial revenue: £5m
  • Total: £97.7m
  • 2018-19 payment: £113.9m
  • Difference: -£16.2m

Norwich City

  • Actual league position: 20th
  • Equal share: £31.8m
  • Facility fees: £11.3m
  • Merit payment: £1.8m
  • Overseas TV income: £44.6m
  • Commercial revenue: £5m
  • Total: £94.5m

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La Liga

Richest football leagues in the world

The Campeonato Nacional de Liga de Primera División, commonly known as La Liga (LaLiga Santander for sponsorship reasons with Santander), is the men's top professional football division of the Spanish football league system.

Administered by the Liga Nacional de Fútbol Profesional, is contested by 20 teams, with the three lowest-placed teams at the end of each season relegated to the Segunda División and replaced by the top two teams and a play-off winner in that division.

Given that the Spanish La Liga is home to Real Madrid and FC Barcelona, two of the best-performing clubs in history, it should come as no surprise that this league knows how to turn a profit to become one of the richest football leagues in the world. La Liga is the second-highest grossing football conglomerate in the world, behind the English Premier League.

In April 1928, José María Acha, a director at Arenas Club de Getxo, first proposed the idea of a national league in Spain. After much debate about the size of the league and who would take part, the Real Federación Española de Fútbol eventually agreed on the ten teams who would form the first Primera División in 1929.

Barcelona, Real Madrid, Athletic Bilbao, Real Sociedad, Arenas Club de Getxo, and Real Unión were all selected as previous winners of the Copa del Rey. Atlético Madrid, Espanyol, and Europa qualified as Copa del Rey runners-up and Racing de Santander qualified through a knockout competition.

Only three of the founding clubs, Real Madrid, Barcelona and Athletic Bilbao, have never been relegated from the Primera División.

The vast empires of these two clubs alone contribute the bulk of the £3.8 billion in annual revenue generated by La Liga last year.

In addition to ticket sales and merch, La Liga earns hundreds of millions from lucrative sponsorship deals from the likes of massive companies like Puma, EA, Budweiser, Santander, and Microsoft.

The Spanish football league's television advertising revenues for the new season are up 20 percent from the previous season, its director for international development said on Friday (Sept 4), as fans unable to attend live matches watch on TV, boosting audiences worldwide.

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Richest football leagues in the world

Spain's La Liga, as one of the richest leagues in the world, has secured revenues from short ads and sponsorships worth €110 million (S$177.9 million) for the 2020-2021 season, said Oscar Mayo.

"With strong viewership, companies keep us in their communication and marketing plans, even though they cut spending overall," he said.

Revenues from Liga's ads - short video snippets before game transmissions start, logos aired during interruptions and billboards modified by computers to show different brands in different regions - come on top of broadcasting rights due to reach €2.1 billion this year.

TV audiences for football have shot up as more people stay at home during the pandemic. The top-flight Spanish league, with stars such as Barcelona's Argentinian striker Lionel Messi and Real Madrid's Croatian midfielder Luka Modric, are a big pull for viewers globally.

Average TV audience for Spanish games rose 48 per cent when the championship resumed after a lockdown imposed in mid-March, with peaks of triple-digit increases in countries such as Belgium and South Africa.

As one of the richest soccer leagues in the world, La Liga has signed an advertising contract with betting and casino company M88 in Asia, oil company Total in Argentina, Orange in the Middle East and Africa and renewed a contract in the United States with Verizon, Mayo said.

More than 40 per cent of La Liga's ad revenues will come from outside Spain this season, he said, up from 8 per cent five years ago.

The TV rights of the Spanish league have also skyrocketed over recent years, as they were worth about €800 million eight years ago.

Spanish soccer giant FC Barcelona generated a record revenue of $959.3 million between 2018 and 2019, making it the sport’s biggest cash-generating club for the first time ever, according to a new report.

Deloitte’s Football Money League 2020 ranked the world’s wealthiest soccer clubs based on their revenue in the 2018/2019 football season.

Barcelona overtook Spanish rival Real Madrid to take the lead, with the latter raking in revenues of $864 million. At more than $95 million, the revenue gap between the top two clubs was the highest in the 23-year history of Deloitte’s Football Money League.

While FC Barcelona’s revenue increased from $823 million the previous year, Real Madrid’s fell from $896 million, the data showed.

 Bundesliga

Richest football leagues in the world

The Bundesliga, sometimes referred to as the Fußball-Bundesliga or 1. Bundesliga, is a professional association football league in Germany and one of the world’s richest soccer leagues.

At the top of the German football league system and among the richest soccer leagues in the world, the Bundesliga is Germany's primary football competition. The Bundesliga comprises 18 teams and operates on a system of promotion and relegation with the 2. Bundesliga.

Seasons run from August to May. Most games are played on Saturdays and Sundays, with a few games played on weekdays. All of the Bundesliga clubs qualify for the DFB-Pokal. The winner of the Bundesliga qualifies for the DFL-Supercup.

Germany's Bundesliga has seen its international prominence and following grow exponentially in recent years, placing it hot on the heels of La Liga with around £3.6 billion in revenues last season as well as on the list of the richest football leagues in the world.

Naturally, Bayern Munich is the big moneymaker, thanks to a brand value estimated at around £1.2 billion.

Richest football leagues in the world

However, teams that were once strictly local phenomenons such as Hamburger SV, Werder Bremen, Borussia Dortmund, and VfB Stuttgart have developed global followings in recent years and have seen their individual revenues rise from tens of millions to hundreds of millions of euros in that time.

The Bundesliga, the top tier of German soccer, exceeded revenue of €4 billion (US$4.3 billion) for the first time during the 2018/19 season, according to the 2020 DFL Economic Report.

Total revenue of €4.2 billion (US$4.6 billion) was generated by the 18 Bundesliga clubs, 5.4 percent uplift on the previous campaign. The increase also marks the league’s 15th successive year of record revenue.

Of the total return, €1.48 billion (US$1.6 billion) was generated from media revenue, while advertising delivered the second-highest contribution at €845.4 million (US$915.8 million).

Bayern are Germany's richest club, with a turnover for 2018/9 of 750.4 million euros ($883 million) and an operating profit of 146.1 million euros.

The 2020 Deloitte Football Money League estimates that Bayern are the fourth richest club in Europe, behind Barcelona, Real Madrid and Manchester United.

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Serie A

Richest football leagues in the world

Italy's Serie A league, now known as Serie A TIM due to a £40 million annual sponsorship deal with the Italian telecoms giant TIM, is another European league with a formidable bank balance. The winner is awarded the Scudetto and the Coppa Campioni d'Italia.

The league, as one of the richest football leagues in the world, drew in around £1.85 billion in revenue last year, largely on the backs of star squads like Juventus, AC Milan, and Internazionale, arguably three of the most iconic clubs on the planet.

Juventus, the most valuable of the lot, is owned by the billionaire Agnelli family, who also happens to own two more of Italy's most famous brands: Fiat and Ferrari.

Clubs in Italian soccer’s top flight, Serie A, saw their revenue grow by 13.5 per cent during the 2018/19 season to €2.77 billion (US$3.05 billion), according to reports.

The Italian sports outlet’s annual review of the clubs’ finances reveals that growth is largely down to TV rights revenues, which also include the cup competitions organised by the league, which went from €1.3 billion to €1.44 billion.

Serie A’s five major clubs - Juventus, Inter Milan, Roma, AC Milan and Napoli - are responsible for more than 57 per cent of the league’s total revenues, bringing in €1.5 billion (US$1.65 billion).

Juventus is a listed professional football club which, with its more than century-long history, has become one of the most representative and popular teams both at Italian and global level.

Juventus has won more than 70 titles in all competitions, becoming the most successful and beloved Italian club with more than 440 million fans all over the world.

For the pandemic-hit 2019/20 season, which saw Juve scoop their ninth consecutive league little, the Old Lady saw year-on-year revenues fall from €621.4 million (US$738.6 million) to €573.4 million (US$681.6 million). Matchday and merchandise income were severely impacted during lockdown and when the campaign resumed behind closed doors.

Ligue 1

Richest football leagues in the world

Ligue 1, also called Ligue 1 Uber Eats due to sponsorship by Uber Eats, is a French professional league for men's association football clubs.

As of 30th June, 2019, Ligue 1's earnings before interest and tax is €1.45 billion (US$1.63 billion).

The French Ligue 1, a relatively small fry in Europe but still the fifth wealthiest soccer league in the world, with revenue of around £1.4 billion last season.

Ligue 1 is among the richest football leagues in the world and its richest club by far is, of course, Paris St Germain, which has been valued at around £900 million. While their revenues may not be as large as the other major European leagues, their finances are arguably the most sound, with the annual Deloitte Football Money League ranking Ligue 1 clubs as having the healthiest finances and largest surpluses out of all other countries in the world.

In the 2018/19 season the revenue of Paris Sait-Germain amounted to 636 million euros. Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, ruler of Qatar, has been PSG's owner since 2011 through state-owned shareholding organization Qatar Sports Investments (QSI).

Champions League

Richest football leagues in the world

The list of the richest football leagues in the world also includes Champions League, which is a supranational sports competition, typically association football that is contested by club teams who have distinguished themselves in their respective national competitions. The name originated with, and most often refers to, the UEFA Champions League.

Total revenue of the 2018/19 season for one of the world’s richest soccer leagues was 2.82 billion euros. For the 2019-20 campaign, the Champions League winner will receive €19,000,000, with the runner-up taking home €15,000,000.

That's on top of the money each finalist will have accrued along the way. Every group stage participant is entitled to €15,250,000 before a single game is played.

As the governing body of European Football, UEFA is responsible for exploiting the commercial rights in the Champions League, the Europa League and the Super Cup.

As one of the richest leagues in the world, UEFA earns significant sums through collectively selling broadcasting rights, commercial rights and tickets/hospitality, and will then distribute those sums back to the participating teams.

 

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